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20+ Products that we Stubbornly Keep in the Refrigerator, Although they do not Belong There

We are used to putting most products in the refrigerator so that they stay fresh as long as possible. But it turns out that this is not entirely correct: not all foodstuffs should be stored at low temperatures, so many products in our refrigerators simply occupy shelves, losing their taste and useful trace elements.

Happy Worthy Life carefully studied the topic and made sure that storage in the cold worsens the appearance and taste of not only many products, but also dishes.

Vegetables

Vegetables
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  • Potatoes. Potato starch under the influence of low temperatures turns into sugar, so frosted potatoes lose their taste, but they acquire a sweet aftertaste. When exposed to low temperatures, the water inside the potato expands and forms crystals that destroy the structure of the cell wall. This makes the vegetable soft and unsuitable for food.
  • Garlic and onions rot due to lack of air circulation and excess moisture.
  • Carrots and beets from storage in the refrigerator begin to wither, and then sprout and rot.
  • Tomatoes in the refrigerator lose all their taste and become watery.
  • Eggplant is an extremely capricious vegetable. It will be too cold – they will become watery and lose their beneficial properties, too warm – will dry out.
  • Zucchini and squash in the refrigerator will become soft and mold will appear on them.
  • Cucumbers Gardeners know that cucumbers are heat-loving vegetables, the same applies to their storage. At low temperatures, cucumbers become soft and friable, dark dots and slimy spots appear on them – the product simply begins to rot.

How right? Vegetables love dry places with good air circulation and away from light. A wooden box will do. Potatoes, tomatoes and peppers are best stored separately, including from each other, as they actively emit ethylene – a gas that accelerates the ripening and spoiling of nearby fruits and vegetables. For onions and garlic, there are proven methods – hang in a grid or store in nylon stockings, as our mothers and grandmothers did.

Fruit

Fruit
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  • Bananas These fruits ripen at a temperature of 15–20 ° C, so if you bought them green, they should not be in the refrigerator. Like ripe, the skin of which begins to darken at low temperatures.
  • Peaches, kiwi, apricots, mangoes, persimmons, pomegranates. If the fruit is hard, do not put it in the cold, as it interferes with the ripening process. Products themselves are at higher risk of being spoiled. But soft fruits like persimmons just become watery.
  1. Citrus. All citrus fruits are better preserved at temperatures above 0 ° C. Cold air in the refrigerator can harm them: due to the increased humidity, the fruits will begin to rot. And lemons and limes well absorb various odors. They can only be placed in the refrigerator for a short time in order to slow them down.

How right? At room temperature. You can put the fruits in paper bags: unripe fruits ripen, and ripe ones do not spoil. The main condition is that air should circulate around them. Bananas, apples, pears, apricots, kiwi, mango, peaches and plums emit ethylene, so they should be put separately.

Dessert

Dessert
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  • Chocolate. The cold is as fatal to him as the heat. At low temperatures, chocolate is coated with a white coating, which is caused by condensation – this part of the sugar dissolves and crystallizes. And chocolate quickly absorbs odors, so at the exit there is a risk of getting chocolate with the aroma of sauerkraut.
  • Honey. Low temperatures cause it to crystallize and solidify – there is no other effect from low temperature. With proper storage, the shelf life of honey is practically unlimited.
  • Peanut and chocolate paste. The only thing you will achieve by hiding these products in the refrigerator is that it will become difficult to spread them on bread. By the way, the timing and storage methods can be found on the packaging of products.

How right? Honey should be stored in a tightly closed glass jar, in a dark place and at room temperature. The pasta is also comfortable in the kitchen cabinet, unless otherwise indicated on the packaging, and the chocolate in a dark place, but cool so that it does not begin to melt and bitter.

Dressings and sauces

Dressings and sauces
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  • Spicy sauces. In spicy sauce, vinegar is more than enough so that it does not deteriorate without a refrigerator.
  • Ketchup. There is no effect on the fact that he is in the refrigerator – he simply takes up space on a shelf. High levels of vinegar and salt prevent product spoilage.
  • Soy sauce. The shelf life of some species reaches 3 years. It has so much salt that it does not need to be stored in the refrigerator even after opening.
  • Salad dressing. Many oil and vinegar-based refills are well-stored and free from low temperatures. The same goes for salads seasoned with olive oil or vinegar.

How right? Unless otherwise indicated on the label, store the sauces in the kitchen cupboard – in what is located farther from the stove.

Flour products

Flour products
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Bread. If you intend to eat bread for several days, do not put it in the refrigerator. Low temperature changes the structure of bread, and it loses taste, and due to high humidity mold can appear on it quite quickly.

Bakery products. At low temperatures, condensation will make delicious buns and pies “sluggish” and raw to the taste.

How right? Wrap buns in a paper bag and store at room temperature. We cover the pies with parchment and put them in a cool place. Bread – in a bread box, preferably made of glass or stainless steel.

Preserves, jams, pickles

Preserves, jams, pickles
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  • Pickles. They are protected against deterioration by a preservative. This applies to all products containing marinade or brine, salt, vinegar and spices that are present in home preserves.
  • Jam or preserves. Provided that the recipe is followed and the jam is properly sealed inside a sterilized jar, it can be stored outside the refrigerator for up to 2 years, but the refrigerator is not the best place for it. Cold storage can stimulate mold growth. Each time you open the refrigerator door, the jar “takes risks”: warm air enters the gap between the jar and the lid and condensation forms, creating an ideal environment for the germination of bacteria.

How right? Do not store open cans in the refrigerator – only cans with lockable lids. Closed marinades, jams, jams can be stored in a cool dark cupboard or on the balcony.

And More..

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